The Venetian Gallery

  • visuel_salle_vénitienne
  • visuel_salle_vénitienne
  • visuel_salle_vénitienne

This final room in the Italian Museum is perhaps the one that owes the most to Edouard André’s personal taste. Fitted out during his lifetime, it brings together works from Venice and the schools of northern Italy. In fact, he had a preference for Venetian art. At the time, very few collectors were of the same mind; Florentine art was all the rage.

In the centre of the left wall, a Madonna and child by Bellini has pride of place, surrounded by three paintings by Mantegna, including the deeply moving Ecce homo. On the back panel are displayed works by Crivelli, Schiavone and above all Vittore Carpaccio; borrowings once again of a medieval outlook or subjected to the influence of Byzantine art, they illustrate the previous generation. Their strange archaism shows that another path other than that of Tuscan humanism was open to these painters.

The quadri riportati ceiling paintings, also Venetian, are in grisaille and combine religious and secular subjects.