The grand salon

  • visuel_grand_salon
  • visuel_grand_salon
  • visuel_grand_salon
  • visuel_grand_salon
  • visuel_grand_salon

Having waited in the Picture Gallery, visitors entered the Grand Salon, a reception room par excellence. It was here that Edouard André welcomed his guests. For particularly large receptions, he would have the side partitions removed by means of hydraulic cylinders to turn the Picture Gallery, the Grand Salon and the adjacent Music Room into a single space. Here Edouard André and Nélie Jacquemart would receive around a thousand guests at sumptuous parties to which Parisian high society flocked during that period.


The Salon differs from the other rooms in its semi-circular design which evokes the 18th-century predilection for curves over straight lines. Its decoration combines elements from the 18th century (the panelling of the doors or the four Gobelins tapestries) with elements created by craftsmen when the mansion was built (the golden panelling on the cornices and the paintings on the overdoors and ceilings) with subtlety and sophistication. Together, they create a harmonious whole, typical of the decorative art being introduced at the time in which furniture, antique objects and copies of style co-existed together: today this is known as eclecticism.


The space does not lend itself to paintings so there are none here, but there is a beautiful collection of marble busts from the 18th century, creating a gallery of sculptures. We can recognise the features of some famous people: politicians but also famous artists hewn by talented sculptors, Coysevox, Lemoyne, Houdon and Michel Ange Slodtz. The portrait in bronze of Henri IV on the mantelpiece is the oldest.